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About Me

I am an Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science at The College of Charleston. I received my doctorate in Computer Science at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte under the supervision of Professor Zbigniew W. Ras in the field of data mining; more precisely, object-driven and temporal-based action rules.
I earned my Bachelor of Science in Computer Information Systems from Yarmouk University, Irbid, Jordan, and my Master of Science in Computer Science from Northern Illinois University, IL.
Other than data mining and machine learning, my interests lie in computer vision, intelligent tutoring systems, crowdsourcing and collective intelligence, gamification, social networks and smart web/mobile systems and their uses to connect people and promote societies. I am also interested in philosophy, and few topics in social science; such as cognitive psychology, evolutionary psychology, social epidemiology, and anthropology.

Research

Courses Taught

  • An introduction to programming and problem solving. Topics include data types, variables, assignment, control structures (selection and iteration), lists, functions, classes, and an introduction to object-oriented programming. Lectures three hours per week.
  • This course is designed to apply the concepts being covered in CSCI 220. Exercises will be assigned each week within a structured setting. Laboratory three hours per week.
  • An introduction to an assembly language and its implementation in hardware. Topics include the binary and hexadecimal numbering systems, the fetch-execute cycle, the components of the central processing unit, floating point processing, memory, the assembler, and the linker. Programming exercises are developed in the assembly language of a commonly available processor. Lectures three hours per week.
  • An intensive investigation of an area of current interest in computer science. Examples of special topics include: Image Processing; Systems Programming; Computability; Design Patterns. Lectures three hours per week.
  • A year-long research and writing project done during the senior year under the close supervision of a tutor from the department. The student must take the initiative in seeking a tutor to help in both the design and the supervision of the project. A project proposal must be submitted in writing and approved by the department prior to registration for the course.
  • Individual instruction given by a tutor in regularly scheduled meetings (usually once a week).
  • Individual instruction given by a tutor in regularly scheduled meetings (usually once a week).
  • Individual instruction given by a tutor in regularly scheduled meetings (usually once a week).
  • Individual instruction given by a tutor in regularly scheduled meetings (usually once a week).
  • A course to introduce the structure of databases and the management of datasets for information extraction. Concepts include the relational and entity relationship models, and local and distributed storage and access. The preparation and management of datasets for analysis is covered, and includes data cleaning, reorganization and security.
  • A study of the programming language C. Data types, operators, functions, program structure, file I/O, storage classes, exceptions, concurrent programming, and the preprocessor.
  • A study of discreet mathematical concepts. Introduction to propositional calculus, predicate calculus, algorithms, logic functions, finite-state machines; and logic design.
  • A study of the theory and implementation of abstract data types (ADTs) including stacks, queues, and both general purpose and specialized trees and graphs. Includes the implementation and analysis of algorithms related to the various data structures studied, including creation, searching, and traversal of ADTs.
  • Introduction to the design and analysis of algorithms. Design techniques: divide-and-conquer, greedy approach, dynamic programming. Algorithm analysis: asymptotic notation, recurrence relation, time space complexity and tradeoffs. Study of sorting, searching, hashing, and graph algorithms.
  • Project Thesis is a three credit hour course for the completion of a formal master?s project thesis under faculty direction. A Project Thesis is characterized by a research project that applies or extends course topics through systems development.
  • This course consists of individual study of an agreed-upon topic under the direction of a faculty member and following a course of reading and other requirements proposed by the student and established by negotiation with the director. This course is intended to provide graduate students with an opportunity to study in an area of computer science, software engineering or information systems that is not generally offered. This course may be repeated once.
  • This course consists of individual study of an agreed-upon topic under the direction of a faculty member and following a course of reading and other requirements proposed by the student and established by negotiation with the director. This course is intended to provide graduate students with an opportunity to study in an area of computer science, software engineering or information systems that is not generally offered. This course may be repeated once.
  • An introduction to the issues, techniques, strategies, representations and patterns used in designing and implementing software. Possible design topics include: specification of internal interfaces, architectural design, data design, user-interface design, design tools and evaluation of design. Possible implementation topics include: language-oriented issues, construction technologies, tools and formal constructions methods.
  • Knowledge systems; knowledge discovery; association rules; action rules, hierarchical classifiers, cascade classifiers, query languages and their semantics; cooperative and collaborative systems; ontology and metadata; flexible query answering; chase algorithms and data sanitization methods; decision support systems in medicine; and automatic indexing of music.

Get in Touch

The College of Charleston
Computer Science Department
Harbor Walk East, Room 304
Charleston, SC 29424
hajjaa@cofc.edu
843-953-6308

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